QUILTED ACTUATORS



Quilted Actuators is part of an exploratory research project in the MIT Media Lab's Information Ecology group into the development of shape-changing pneumatic textiles as a medium to create dynamic forms to communicate information through physical objects


PROJECT SUMMARY:
The information that we want to communicate and be communicated to us is dynamic. Objects can convey this information through their forms [1], and therefore their forms, and the materials from which they are made, must be dynamic too. Building on the Emotive Form Design framework developed in Tactile AllegoryTactile Allegory, Quilted Actuators uses scalable lamination fabrication processes to explore the design of various shape-changing forms. Individual modules are created which can create different actuation dynamics. For example, folding to create a corner edge, compressing to form many ridges, or curving to form a rounded surface.

Pneumatic Textile Cell - Fold

Silicone coated fabric and silicone layers in
an elliptical shape creates fold along
centerline when inflated
Folding actuation cell_deflated
Folding actuation cell_inflated


Pneumatic Textile Cell - Ridge

Silicone coated fabric and silicone layers in
many joined elliptical shapes create a
ridged form in the fabric when inflated
Ridged actuation cell_deflated
Ridged actuation cell_inflated


Pneumatic Textile Cell - Curve

Silicone coated fabric and silicone layers in
a curved crossed shape creates two orthogonal
folds when inflated, curving the fabric
Ridged actuation cell_deflated
Ridged actuation cell_inflated


My vision is that these actuation 'cells' could then be integrated into larger textile structures to create objects with dynamic and communicative aesthetics.



1. Lee, Jong-Hoon, Jin-Yung Park, and Tek-Jin Nam. "Emotional interaction through physical movement." Human-Computer Interaction. HCI Intelligent Multimodal Interaction Environments. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2007. 401-410.


Research carried out as part of a Masters in Media Arts and Sciences, MIT Media Lab (Sept 2012-May 2013)